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Microsoft Teams

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks

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Teams + Power Automate = Automation awesomeness! With the new Teams connector (currently in preview), you can automate tasks with Power Automate and trigger events using Teams data. The Teams connector enables you to use in Logic Apps, Power Automate, and Power Apps.

Using flow with Teams

Power Automate can be used in these scenarios with Teams:

  • Trigger flows from Teams messages
  • List, run, describe flow from Power Automate bot
  • Use flows with adaptive cards
  • Create flows from within the Power Automate app in Teams

You can start with a blank flow or choose to create a new flow based on one of the popular Teams templates (Figure 1):

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 1: Power Automate popular Teams templates and Teams triggers and actions.

You can trigger a flow when keywords are mentioned in a chat or channel conversation and use actions to create a team, add a member to a team, and even create a basic team from a flow. Figure 2 shows some of the common triggers and actions available for the Teams connector:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 2: Microsoft Teams triggers and actions in Power Automate.

Teams apps: Power Automate & Approvals app

There are two apps available to add into Teams: the Power Automate app and the Approvals app.

  • Power Automate app: Automates Teams activities or connects to other apps and services using the Power Automate app in Teams. Create, manage, and edit Teams flows or All Flows directly within this app.
  • Approvals app: Send, receive, manage, and share approvals in directly within Teams.
Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 3: Power Automate app in Teams.

The Power Automate app in Teams has multiple tabs for different functions. The Home tab displays a list of all your Teams flows, and you can change the drop-down filter to display All flows:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 5: Power Automate app Home tab displaying All flows option in filter drop-down.

The Create tab displays an embedded page with a list of categorized templates (Figure 5). You can choose from to create a new flow from a template, or you can click on the + Create from blank button:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 5: Power Automate app in Teams Create tab page with categorized templates.

Adaptive Cards for Teams

Adaptive Cards are platform-agnostic user interface snippets of used within Power Automate to share blocks of information or to collect data. They are created in JSON format and transformed into the native UI the adaptive card is being rendered in. You can design your own Adaptive Card and use the card in flow actions to post to a Teams chat or channel, or as a Flow bot to a user. If you want to collect data from an Adaptive Card, you can use the action to post an Adaptive Card to Teams and wait for a response:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 6: Adaptive Card actions for the Microsoft Teams connector in Power Automate.

When I’m designing Adaptive Cards, I like to use the free online Adaptive Cards Designer so I can edit and preview the card before committing to its use.

READ MORE: Overview of Adaptive Cards for Microsoft Teams

Teams App Template: Request a Team

A few years ago, Microsoft launched App Templates for Microsoft Teams, a gallery of pre-built templates you can easily deploy for Teams. One of the most common app templates organizations have deployed is an app to allow end users to request the creation of a new team. The Request a Team template provides a way to implement a create team request approval/provisioning process through a wizard-guided request form, embedded approval process, request dashboard, and automated team builds.

The Request a Team app template consists of the following:

  • Power App: Surfaced in Teams with tabs and home screen.
  • SharePoint lists: Three lists used to store the data for the Team Request Settings, Teams Templates, and Teams Requests.
  • Microsoft Teams: A team for admins to approve team requests that get posted as Adaptive Cards from the flow.
  • Power Automate flows: Two flows. One flow triggered from a button in the Power App to check if the team name is available. Second flow is used for the approval process of the request that sends an adaptive card to Teams and saves the response in a SharePoint list.
  • Logic App: The Azure Logic App runs at a scheduled interval to read from the Teams Request SharePoint list and provisions a team for all requests that have been approved and not yet created. It sends an email to the requestor once the team is created.

When the app is deployed in your tenant, you can add the Request-a -team app as a tab in Teams:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 7: Add a tab dialog with the Request-a-team app available to select.

The Power App will default to the Request a team screen which gives the requester a choice to create a team from scratch or create from a template:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 8: Request-a-team Power App embedded in the team as a tab default screen.

The requester continues with the request through the wizard-guide and input all required fields in the app. On the Team information screen, they will provide a Team name and then click on the Check availability button which triggers the Check Team Availability flow that checks to see if the team name is available:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 9: Check availability button that triggers the Check Team Availability flow.

If the requester chooses to create a team from a template, they see a screen with a drop-down of templates to select. The template information is pulled from the data in the Teams Template SharePoint list:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 10: Select a template screen in the Power App that pulls from the Teams Templates SharePoint list.

The last screen of the wizard is the Review and submit screen, where the requestor can preview the information of their request and either go Back and make changes or click Submit to send the request:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 11: Review and submit screen with sample request.

The Submit button saves the data of the request to the Teams Requests SharePoint list.

When a new item is added to the SharePoint list, the Status defaults to Pending Approval and the Team Request Approval flow runs. The flow then posts an Adaptive Card to the target channel in the Request a Team Admins team and waits for the response for approval:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 12: Adaptive Card posted from the Team Request Approval flow in the team for admin approval.

The approver has buttons to Approve or Reject the request. When a button is selected the Add a comment box displays with a Submit button:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 13: Adaptive Card updated to show response submitted.
Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 14: Resource group with ProcessTeamsRequest Logic app used for provisioning the teams that have been requested and approved.
Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 15: ProcessTeamRequest Logic app with When an item is created or modified trigger to run on a schedule pulling from the Teams Requests SharePoint list.

When the logic app runs, it will read and process requests from the Teams Requests SharePoint list. It has steps to loop through and add owners and members (if requestor added members in the request) as well as check the template type of the request. The provisioning process takes around 5 minutes for each team it processes:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 16: ProcessTeamRequest Logic app steps for looping through members and owners values from the request in the SharePoint list.

Once the team has been provisioned, the logic app sends an email to the requestor letting them know the team has been created as shown:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 17: ProcessTeamRequest Logic app with When an item is created or modified trigger to run on a schedule pulling from the Teams Requests SharePoint list.

The team shows up in Teams for the owners and members with a welcome message posted from an action in the logic app:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 18: New team created by the logic app with welcome message that was posted from an action in the logic app.

Summary

I hope you enjoy my session at TEC on September 1st, as well as this companion article to help understand the integration with Teams and Power Automate. I encourage you to try out the Request a Team app template as well as many of the other Power Platform app template solutions available to download at https://aka.ms/TeamsAppTemplates. You can use the templates as is or modify any of them to fit your needs. Please note: if you encounter issues with the deployment please raise an issue in the GitHub repo.

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Microsoft Teams

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks

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Teams + Power Automate = Automation awesomeness! With the new Teams connector (currently in preview), you can automate tasks with Power Automate and trigger events using Teams data. The Teams connector enables you to use in Logic Apps, Power Automate, and Power Apps.

Using flow with Teams

Power Automate can be used in these scenarios with Teams:

  • Trigger flows from Teams messages
  • List, run, describe flow from Power Automate bot
  • Use flows with adaptive cards
  • Create flows from within the Power Automate app in Teams

You can start with a blank flow or choose to create a new flow based on one of the popular Teams templates (Figure 1):

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 1: Power Automate popular Teams templates and Teams triggers and actions.

You can trigger a flow when keywords are mentioned in a chat or channel conversation and use actions to create a team, add a member to a team, and even create a basic team from a flow. Figure 2 shows some of the common triggers and actions available for the Teams connector:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 2: Microsoft Teams triggers and actions in Power Automate.

Teams apps: Power Automate & Approvals app

There are two apps available to add into Teams: the Power Automate app and the Approvals app.

  • Power Automate app: Automates Teams activities or connects to other apps and services using the Power Automate app in Teams. Create, manage, and edit Teams flows or All Flows directly within this app.
  • Approvals app: Send, receive, manage, and share approvals in directly within Teams.
Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 3: Power Automate app in Teams.

The Power Automate app in Teams has multiple tabs for different functions. The Home tab displays a list of all your Teams flows, and you can change the drop-down filter to display All flows:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 5: Power Automate app Home tab displaying All flows option in filter drop-down.

The Create tab displays an embedded page with a list of categorized templates (Figure 5). You can choose from to create a new flow from a template, or you can click on the + Create from blank button:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 5: Power Automate app in Teams Create tab page with categorized templates.

Adaptive Cards for Teams

Adaptive Cards are platform-agnostic user interface snippets of used within Power Automate to share blocks of information or to collect data. They are created in JSON format and transformed into the native UI the adaptive card is being rendered in. You can design your own Adaptive Card and use the card in flow actions to post to a Teams chat or channel, or as a Flow bot to a user. If you want to collect data from an Adaptive Card, you can use the action to post an Adaptive Card to Teams and wait for a response:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 6: Adaptive Card actions for the Microsoft Teams connector in Power Automate.

When I’m designing Adaptive Cards, I like to use the free online Adaptive Cards Designer so I can edit and preview the card before committing to its use.

READ MORE: Overview of Adaptive Cards for Microsoft Teams

Teams App Template: Request a Team

A few years ago, Microsoft launched App Templates for Microsoft Teams, a gallery of pre-built templates you can easily deploy for Teams. One of the most common app templates organizations have deployed is an app to allow end users to request the creation of a new team. The Request a Team template provides a way to implement a create team request approval/provisioning process through a wizard-guided request form, embedded approval process, request dashboard, and automated team builds.

The Request a Team app template consists of the following:

  • Power App: Surfaced in Teams with tabs and home screen.
  • SharePoint lists: Three lists used to store the data for the Team Request Settings, Teams Templates, and Teams Requests.
  • Microsoft Teams: A team for admins to approve team requests that get posted as Adaptive Cards from the flow.
  • Power Automate flows: Two flows. One flow triggered from a button in the Power App to check if the team name is available. Second flow is used for the approval process of the request that sends an adaptive card to Teams and saves the response in a SharePoint list.
  • Logic App: The Azure Logic App runs at a scheduled interval to read from the Teams Request SharePoint list and provisions a team for all requests that have been approved and not yet created. It sends an email to the requestor once the team is created.

When the app is deployed in your tenant, you can add the Request-a -team app as a tab in Teams:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 7: Add a tab dialog with the Request-a-team app available to select.

The Power App will default to the Request a team screen which gives the requester a choice to create a team from scratch or create from a template:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 8: Request-a-team Power App embedded in the team as a tab default screen.

The requester continues with the request through the wizard-guide and input all required fields in the app. On the Team information screen, they will provide a Team name and then click on the Check availability button which triggers the Check Team Availability flow that checks to see if the team name is available:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 9: Check availability button that triggers the Check Team Availability flow.

If the requester chooses to create a team from a template, they see a screen with a drop-down of templates to select. The template information is pulled from the data in the Teams Template SharePoint list:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 10: Select a template screen in the Power App that pulls from the Teams Templates SharePoint list.

The last screen of the wizard is the Review and submit screen, where the requestor can preview the information of their request and either go Back and make changes or click Submit to send the request:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 11: Review and submit screen with sample request.

The Submit button saves the data of the request to the Teams Requests SharePoint list.

When a new item is added to the SharePoint list, the Status defaults to Pending Approval and the Team Request Approval flow runs. The flow then posts an Adaptive Card to the target channel in the Request a Team Admins team and waits for the response for approval:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 12: Adaptive Card posted from the Team Request Approval flow in the team for admin approval.

The approver has buttons to Approve or Reject the request. When a button is selected the Add a comment box displays with a Submit button:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 13: Adaptive Card updated to show response submitted.
Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 14: Resource group with ProcessTeamsRequest Logic app used for provisioning the teams that have been requested and approved.
Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 15: ProcessTeamRequest Logic app with When an item is created or modified trigger to run on a schedule pulling from the Teams Requests SharePoint list.

When the logic app runs, it will read and process requests from the Teams Requests SharePoint list. It has steps to loop through and add owners and members (if requestor added members in the request) as well as check the template type of the request. The provisioning process takes around 5 minutes for each team it processes:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 16: ProcessTeamRequest Logic app steps for looping through members and owners values from the request in the SharePoint list.

Once the team has been provisioned, the logic app sends an email to the requestor letting them know the team has been created as shown:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 17: ProcessTeamRequest Logic app with When an item is created or modified trigger to run on a schedule pulling from the Teams Requests SharePoint list.

The team shows up in Teams for the owners and members with a welcome message posted from an action in the logic app:

Teams + Power Automate: Practical Examples to Automate Tasks
Figure 18: New team created by the logic app with welcome message that was posted from an action in the logic app.

Summary

I hope you enjoy my session at TEC on September 1st, as well as this companion article to help understand the integration with Teams and Power Automate. I encourage you to try out the Request a Team app template as well as many of the other Power Platform app template solutions available to download at https://aka.ms/TeamsAppTemplates. You can use the templates as is or modify any of them to fit your needs. Please note: if you encounter issues with the deployment please raise an issue in the GitHub repo.

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Microsoft Teams

Teams Advanced Communications Add-on (Version 2) Ready to Go

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Another Tour of the Confusing World of Microsoft 365 Licensing

In April 2021, Microsoft announced their plans to add a Teams Pro service plan to existing Office 365 licenses. After confusing everyone, Microsoft quickly decided to rename the Teams Pro service plan to become Teams for Office 365 E3 (or whatever product you had, like Teams for Microsoft 365 Business Premium). The explanation was that the new name would align Teams with the various Office 365 and Microsoft 365 commercial licenses.

At the same time, Microsoft stayed silent about their plans for Teams Advanced Communications, an add-on they had launched at a hefty $12/month price tag in July 2020. A certain pandemic and customer pushback resulted in Microsoft rethinking its strategy for Teams Advanced Communications and many of the original features lined up for the add-on, like large meetings and support for Teams-based webinars, are now available in all Teams plans.

Everyone loves a trier and Microsoft has a track record of not getting things right the first time out, so we shouldn’t be surprised to learn that they’re preparing to relaunch the Teams Advanced Communications add-on. Revised documentation appeared online on August 19 to tell us what we can expect in terms of functionality. Microsoft hasn’t yet released pricing details.

Features in Teams Advanced Communications

The Advanced Communications features listed by Microsoft are:

  • The ability to customize the meeting pre-join screens by including a company logo in the pre-join and lobby screens. I’ve seen this used by Microsoft where the Microsoft logo appears in the pre-join screen where you select options like the device you want to use. It is Microsoft 365 roadmap item 79957.
  • Customized backgrounds for Together mode. You can create custom backgrounds into which presenters and attendees are placed when the organizer selects together mode. I’m sure some people will get very creative in the Teams Scene Studio to build interesting backgrounds. Or maybe they will restrict themselves to worthy scenes like the lobby or board room of a company HQ. This capability is described in MC258034 (July 30) and Microsoft 365 roadmap item 81123. I’m unsure whether the creators of the custom scenes or anyone who uses a custom together mode background needs a Teams Advanced Communications license. Given normal practice, it’s probably the latter.
  • Better monitoring and data analysis for user communications. Real-time telemetry is available to end users in meetings (MC265449, June 28) and Microsoft 365 roadmap item 70777 to help people understand network conditions which might affect successful participation in meetings. Again, no details are available what this capability might be, but it’s likely to extend the data collection and analysis across groups of users or an entire tenant.
  • Deploy custom Teams policy packages. You can edit and deploy the out-of-the-box Teams policy packages without an Advanced Communications license, but once you decide to build your own policy packages, those licenses are needed for each user which comes within the scope of a policy. I think this is a silly requirement and said so in my review of Teams policy packages.

To be fair, we need to wait for pricing information to decide if the capabilities licensed by Teams Advanced Communications license is worth the cost. To be truthful, I don’t see anything earthshattering in the list of capabilities described so far, but Microsoft might have some other features lined up. For instance, Microsoft has increased limits for attendance and length for live events until December 31, 2021. After that time, their current guidance is that the increased limits will only apply when organizers have Advanced Communication licenses.

We Definitely Won’t Include These Features in Other Teams Plans

Microsoft says that the Teams Advanced Communication add-on can be used with any Microsoft 365 or Office 365 plan. They also explicitly call out that the features covered will not appear in other plans (famous last words?) and can’t be purchased separately. If you want the capabilities, you need to purchase licenses. Unless your tenant is in the government clouds, in which case Advanced Communications isn’t available (yet).

The features are available in preview until December 31, 2021, after which Microsoft might enforce licensing. Given preview availability, it wouldn’t surprise me if Microsoft waited until the end of 2021 before deciding about pricing.

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Microsoft Teams

Teams Consumer Gets a New Boss Just in Time to Deliver Windows 11 Client

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New Leaders, New Drive

The news that Microsoft has hired Manik Gupta as the new leader for Teams Consumer and Skype wasn’t surprising. Teams consumer, or to use its other title, Teams for your personal life, has barely made a dent in consumer consciousness since its debut last year. Perhaps Gupta’s experience in apps will boost the capabilities of Teams consumer and make it more attractive to people who use apps like WhatsApp and Facebook to organize their personal lives.

New leaders often bring a mixture of focus and creativity that’s needed to move an organization forward, and that’s probably what Microsoft hopes for here. They did the same for Yammer some years ago when they hired Murali Sitaram to lead that product out of a deep dive. There’s been some good progress in Yammer since, largely hidden by the success Teams has had in the same period.

Teams and Windows 11

The next big thing for Teams consumer is its debut as a chat and calling client in Windows 11. According to Rish Tandon, Microsoft Corporate VP for Teams engineering, this will be the first iteration of a new Teams client (generation 2), moving away from the original and current Electron base to use the Edge WebView2 component and ReactJS. According to Tandon, the new architecture will allow Teams to add support for multiple accounts, reduce memory consumption by half, and speed performance.

Need to Wait for a New Enterprise Teams Client

However, this description is for the Teams consumer client, not its enterprise counterpart. I’ve seen some ill-informed commentary that a new Teams enterprise client will be available soon after Windows 11 ships which will deliver all the benefits of the new architecture. Sorry folks, that’s neither true nor realistic. The Teams consumer client is a pale shadow of the enterprise client. Microsoft must reengineer a bunch of enterprise-focused features to make sure that everything works smoothly on the new platform. The kind of thing I’m referring to includes:

  • Channels (regular, private, and public), including guest user access and external federation. In addition, there’s the channel management features like analytics, email integration, and archiving.
  • Teams Voice enterprise features like calling plans and integration with meeting room systems.
  • Teams meetings, including webinars, meeting recordings, transcription, and other resources (like forms used for polls in meetings).
  • Apps and connectors, including first-party apps like Yammer Communities, Viva Insights, Viva Learning, Stream, and Tasks (Planner). Plus, app setup policies and other enterprise controls and all the stuff which third-party developers depend on for apps like the Adobe Sign integration with the Teams Approvals app.
  • Offline access for messaging.
  • Making sure everything works well on Windows, Mac, and Linux (desktop and browser).

In short, there’s lots more involved in moving the Teams enterprise client to a new platform than there is to create a new chat and calling client to replace Skype in Windows 11. Microsoft has stayed tight-lipped on the delivery date for enterprise versions of the Teams desktop and browser clients based on the new architecture. I don’t expect to see this software released much before the end of Q1 CY2022. I could be wrong, but I suspect not. It just takes time to do software right.

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Microsoft Teams

How to Control Sending Email to Teams Channels

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Email Integration Allows Channels to Receive Email

By default, any channel in a team can receive email from any sender. Teams supports this capability by assigning email addresses to channels on an on-demand basis and using inbound email sent to create new conversations in the target channels. It all sounds good and works smoothly, and it’s there because many interesting ideas and suggestions surface in email first. Those involved in the discussion then have the choice to continue in email or take the debate to a suitable Teams channel where others can join the conversation, and everyone sees what’s going on.

Organization-level Control

If you’d prefer to impose some control over email communications to Teams, head for the Org-wide settings section of the Teams admin center and select Teams settings. The Email integration section (Figure 1) allows tenants to:

  • Disable or enable the ability of users to send email to channel email addresses. The default is On.
  • Create an accepted list of domains from where email can originate. The default is to accept email from any domain.
Email integration settings in the Teams admin center
Figure 1: Email integration settings in the Teams admin center

If your organization uses several domains, make sure to include all the domains used to send email in the list of accepted domains. Individual team owners cannot override the set of accepted domains defined for a tenant.

Updating with PowerShell

You can also update the settings with PowerShell by running the Set-CsTeamsClientConfiguration cmdlet from the Teams module. In this example, we update the settings to allow channels to receive email from a restricted list of three domains:

Note the use of semi-colons to separate the domain names rather than the commas specified in Microsoft’s documentation. In addition, do not leave spaces between the domain names. It can take an hour or so before the addition or removal of a domain from the list becomes effective.

Generating Email Address for Teams Channels

A channel email address is composed of an eight-character identifier, the name of the default email address policy (if the tenant has a special address policy for groups, the domain specified in that policy is used), and the Teams messaging domain which handles delivery to the channel. An example is:

1e2d0ee3.office365itpros.com@emea.teams.ms

In this instance, the emea.teams.ms domain tells us that the tenant is in the EMEA (Western Europe) datacenter region. Other values include na.teams.ms (North America) and apac.teams.ms (Asia Pacific).

You cannot change the name or format used for the identifier. Teams generates the value automatically the first time a team member from the tenant requests an email address for a channel, and one is not already present. Guest members can retrieve a channel email address if one exists, but they can’t generate a new address. Team members (except guests) can also remove the email address for a channel. If someone does, Teams generates a new address for the channel the next time a team member requests one.

The new channel email address will not be the same as the original, meaning that anything depending on that email address will cease to work and email senders will receive non-delivery notifications saying:

Delivery has failed to these recipients or groups:

ce49a0c3.office365itpros.com@emea.teams.ms
This channel was not found, so we couldn’t send your message. If you have any questions, contact the team owner.

Teams captures audit records when team members generate or remove channel email addresses. Here’s an example of how to interrogate the audit log to find the relevant records. You can’t generate a report of Teams channels with email addresses using pure PowerShell, but you can with a combination of PowerShell and Graph API calls.

Routing Email to Channels

Email delivery to a Teams channel is more complicated than to a mailbox. Channel email addresses do not point to normal Exchange Online mailboxes. Microsoft manages these mailboxes, which are inaccessible to customers. Like other email addresses, the domains are resolvable in DNS. We can see from this output that messages sent to emea.team.ms go to protection.outlook.com, just like any other Exchange Online domain. In other words, the first step in their transfer is to have Exchange Online Protection process the messages.

The special target mailboxes act as a reception point for email sent to Teams. Connectors pick up the email delivered to the mailboxes and create new conversations in the target channel (Figure 2). In this example, the sender set the message importance to be High, so Teams flags the conversation as Important.

Reading an email as a conversation in a Teams channel
Figure 2: Reading an email as a conversation in a Teams channel

Note the way Teams uses the message subject as the conversation subject. If people forward messages to Teams channels, it’s a good idea to review the message subject before sending to make sure that the conversation has an appropriate and meaningful subject in the channel.

If you want the message to arrive in multiple channels, you must include the address for all the target channels in the message.

Teams imposes some rules on the kind of messages it will accept. In most cases, these restrictions won’t get in the way of users:

  • Messages can’t have more than 50 inline images or more than 20 file attachments.
  • No attachment can be larger than 10 MB.

Capturing Copies of Email in SharePoint Online

When Teams creates a new conversation, it also stores the copy of the original message in a subfolder of the channel folder in the SharePoint Online site belonging to the team (Figure 3). Up to February 2021, Teams used the EmailMessages subfolder. Now, Teams creates a separate subfolder monthly, which is why you see the messages in the EmailMessages_8_2021 (August 2021) folder.

Copies of email messages sent to a channel stored in SharePoint Online
Figure 3: Copies of email messages sent to a channel stored in SharePoint Online

If you want to access the original message, use the View original email option to download a copy of the .eml file. The .eml file is a faithful copy of the original, complete with headers showing the transfer of the message from the sending server to delivery for Teams.

Getting and Using Channel Email Addresses

To retrieve the address of a channel, use the Get email address option in the channel menu and then use the Copy button (Figure 4) to copy the email address to the clipboard. The user can then paste the address into email headers as needed. Note the dangerous option to remove the email address from the channel as discussed above.

How to Control Sending Email to Teams Channels
Figure 4: Retrieving the email address for a channel

Figure 5 shows the advanced settings view, which includes the email address (and a display name composed from the channel name and the team name). We can also see any limitations set on email delivery. A team owner can choose to limit acceptance to email sent by team members. Otherwise, Teams will accept email from any email address and deliver it to the channel (even to private channels) if the sender complies with the restricted domain list configured for the tenant.

Advanced settings for a channel email address
Figure 5: Advanced settings for a channel email address

If delivery is restricted to a channel and the sender is not a team member or from an accepted domain, they receive a message from Teams with the following:

Delivery has failed to these recipients or groups:

1e2d0eb3.office365itpros.com@emea.teams.ms
The administrator has restricted permissions to send emails to this channel.

Using Channel Email Addresses in Distribution Lists and Groups

Obviously, people can use the channel email address to address a message on an ad-hoc basis. For more persistent use, you can create a mail contact for the channel address. This approach has the advantages of making the address readily available to all users through the GAL and allowing the channel to be a member of a distribution list. Microsoft’s support documentation for sending email to a channel calls out using a channel address as part of a distribution list. I have never had an issue when using a channel email address for a mail contact and adding the mail contact to distribution lists.

If you want to have the channel in a Microsoft 365 group, you can use the channel address to create a guest account in Azure AD and include the guest account in the group membership. I use this technique to capture copies of all messages sent to a Microsoft 365 group in a team channel.

Keeping Ideas Flowing

The Email Integration capability in Teams allow users to send messages to channels to create new conversation threads as easily as sending email to any other recipient. It’s a nice feature to have and something that people who split their work communications between email and Teams will find useful, once they know how to use the technology. Isn’t that always the way?

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The Practical 365 Update: S2, Ep 24 – Skype Retires (or does it?), Windows 365 pricing & Teams 2.0 surprises us – plus MVP Ingo Gegenwarth talks managing Exchange Online at scale

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The Skype for Business Online service has retired

First up on the show this week we discuss how Skype for Business finally received it’s gold watch, picked up it’s belongings and waved goodbye to Microsoft 365.

Or has it? Well it has indeed past the the retirement date but many scheduled dates for final retirement are in mid August, so if you think you are already fully Teams-only but didn’t do it yourself – check the Message Center and check the Teams Admin Center to validate you are actually fully Teams only. You may find you aren’t yet and this is your last call to double check all users are happily over on Microsoft Teams before Microsoft remove the capability.

Read more from Stale on Practical 365: Skype for Business Online is retiring – What does it mean? (practical365.com)

Windows 365 is available for you to buy or try right now

On August 2nd, Microsoft launched Windows 365 and if you haven’t already, then it is worth giving it a test drive. We discussed it’s virtues on the last episode, but this time we talk pricing. How much will you need to spend to get a good experience with Microsoft Teams?

Announcing the general availability of Windows 365 – Microsoft Tech Community

Windows 365 pricing: scorecard – Out of Office Hours (oofhours.com)

Teams v2.0 Rolls Out to Windows 11

On the podcast we joked Teams is driving up the cost of Windows 365 – but any conspiracy theory will be short lived once you see Teams v2.0. It arrived in the Windows 11 Insider builds last week, and is only for use with the consumer version of Teams right now, but it is the codebase that will be the Business and Enterprise version eventually, using the new WebView2 model.

During the show, Teams was consuming around a gigabyte of RAM (and wasn’t even being used) whilst when using the Teams v2.0 client memory usage was 72MB – on par with Skype for Business. During the week I’ve seen it use just over 100MB RAM and the screenshot below (taken during writing this article, with the client open) was only 7MB at one point:

A screenshot of Windows Task Manager showing Microsoft Teams using 497.5MB compared to Microsoft Teams (Preview) using 7.7MB
The current version of Teams consuming nearly 500MB with Teams 2.0 consuming less than 10MB while open and active

In reality, it’s possible to make it use more – a bit of pushing the client raises the utilisation up to 202MB in total, and it can spawn WebView2 processes as well – but it’s pretty positive compared the existing client.

A screenshot of Windows Task Manager showing the memory usage of 202.9MB of Microsoft Teams (Preview)
Being pushed a little, Teams v2.0 can take up more RAM with around 202MB in use in this example

OneNote – One version to rule them all?

We’ve been here before – but is it the same thing this time around? In the battle of confusing different OneNote apps that both want you to love them, only one won it out. The version of OneNote that comes as part of Office (sorry, Microsoft 365 apps) on Windows is the one most people really like, but several Microsoft decided the UWP Windows 10 version would be the one they invested in for the future, even planning to take OneNote out of Office at one point.

In the end though, Microsoft did decide to continue developing OneNote as part of Office, and it is this version – not the Windows 10 version that appears to be the one that will be the only one going forward.

What’s Coming to OneNote – Microsoft Tech Community

Microsoft MVP and MCM, Ingo Gegenwarth joins us to talk about managing Exchange Online at scale

Keep your eyes on the site next week for Ingo’s article on this topic, because I’ve had a sneak preview and it is worthwhile reading, as is his session at TEC 2021. Ingo manages Exchange Online for a very large, well known company, and tells us what’s involved in day-to-day admin of Exchange at that scale. I’ve known Ingo for quite a few years and know that he managed the equivalent on-premises Exchange environment too, so it’s interesting to hear how that compares. It’s certainly not the same as outsourcing.

We chat about the challenges of pulling information out of Exchange Online for scripting and reporting – and how the Exchange Online PowerShell Module V2 (install it via Microsoft 365 Administration Portals and PowerShell Connections) improves performance compared to older modules, when using new Microsoft Graph-based cmdlets; and then how to go even further when improving script performance by using Graph directly. Finally for Exchange admins, Ingo talks about how Graph and PowerShell skills can make you more valuable as the skills can be re-used across Microsoft 365.,

Roadmap and Rolling out

On the roadmap and in the message center this week, we talk about several key new features that will be arriving soon:

Microsoft Teams: Content from camera

We talk about the content camera – a.k.a. the magic whiteboard available in Teams Rooms and how it is coming to the PC client. This means with a second webcam, pointed at a whiteboard you’ll be able to bring this into your meeting without an expensive room system. Paul in particular is excited about this.

“Content from camera” in Teams enables you to share content from physical artefacts such as whiteboards and documents in a high quality and legible way during meetings. All you need is a laptop or PC with an in-built camera or with an attached USB camera. Educators can also share content directly from a document camera.”

Teams Meetings to Auto-Expire

And we know that people don’t remove data they don’t need – Teams meetings recordings being an excellent example. Although you can change the policy to stop this happening – and it won’t affect files held for compliance reasons – this will help ensure people don’t waste storage by simply leaving meeting recordings to wither away, long dead in their OneDrive for Business document library, or worse, SharePoint Online.

“Newly created Teams meeting recordings in OneDrive and SharePoint will be automatically deleted by the service based on a default Teams policy setting. Teams Admins will be able to modify the default meeting recording expiration time via a setting in the Teams Admin Portal or by modifying policy attributes using Powershell scripts. Newly created meeting recordings in OneDrive & SharePoint will be automatically deleted after this point unless the meeting owner extends the expiration.  Meeting owners will be notified about expired recordings and may extend the expiration date in OneDrive/SharePoint. Compliance policies will override the expiration setting.”

Both planned for September CY2021

Releasing Fluid live components in Teams chat

Particularly interesting to me is the new fluid live components arriving in Microsoft Teams, and as soon as I have my hands on them in a production tenant, I’ll be recording a video to show you how it works, and when to use it.

I’m most excited for the capability in meetings and chats to avoid needing to have a separate document, OneNote, Wiki or worksheet to collect agenda items or have one person note them down and have to paste them into the chat. Now you’ll be able to create a single, live table, agenda or similar list and everyone can edit it during the chat or meeting. It is stored as a .fluid file and therefore follows OneDrive and SharePoint retention and compliance rules.

Tony Redmond explores live components in more detail: Teams Chat Becomes Fluid (or Lively) (practical365.com)

New Side-by-side and Reporter Presenter modes with desktop and window sharing

And finally Teams rolls out new presenter modes – side-by-side and reporter views. These are long-awaited and in my view, look more professional than standout view, which often obscures the screen.

Read more about these (from when they were announced in March) in my article here: Teams Meeting Improvements to Make Presenters Look Smarter (practical365.com)

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Microsoft Teams

Microsoft Acquires Peer5 to Beef Up Microsoft Teams Video Conferencing

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Microsoft-Teams-98-Participants-Gallery-View

Microsoft Teams is one of the most popular video conferencing tools in the world. While beginning as a workplace chat and collaboration tool, Microsoft has shown increasing interest in video meetings to compete with Zoom. To help the future growth of Teams, Microsoft is acquiring Peer5, a company that already provides optimization services for the platform.

In a blog post, Microsoft reveals it is snapping up Peer5 for an undisclosed amount to fold into the Microsoft Teams ecosystem.

If you are unfamiliar with Peer5, it is a firm that has an Enterprise Content Delivery Network (eCDN) product on the WebRTC open source communication engine. The solution runs on a web browser to increase bandwidth, a useful tool when making video calls in a multi-participant meeting.

One of the main benefits of Peer5’s technology is it can fold directly into networks without needing any installation or changes to the network.

eCDN Integration

Microsoft points out customers using Microsoft Teams has sent many requests for an in-built eCDN service. Instead of developing one, it seems the company just went shopping for a solution.

“As Microsoft Teams has become the primary communications and collaboration platform for many of our customers, they’ve asked us for more integrated eCDN solutions for large-scale meetings and virtual events. Today, we’re excited to announce that we have acquired Peer5 to expand our ability for delivering secure, high-quality, large-scale live video streaming with optimized network performance in Teams.”

While Peer5 will become part of Microsoft Teams, current agreements with customers will be maintained. Microsoft will also continue to support other eCDN solutions from partner providers.

Tip of the day: Worried about your privacy in Windows 10 or want to keep different PCs linked to your Microsoft account strictly separate? We show you how to adjust your Windows 10 sync settings , including the clipboard, activity history/timeline, and themes.

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Microsoft Teams

Microsoft Expands Skype Together Mode to 1:1 Calls

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With the growing popularity of Microsoft Teams and the focus Microsoft is putting on that service, Skype is becoming something of a forgotten platform. However, at least for now, Microsoft believes Teams and Skype can co-exist and provide differing functionality to users. In fact, Microsoft is now expanding its Together Mode feature on Skype.

With Together mode, Microsoft wants team members and meeting participants to appear as if they are in the same location. It is a small touch, but a nice one for organizations that value a uniform output.

By using AI segmentation, Microsoft Teams can place meeting participants within a shared background. The idea behind this is to make it look more like participants are in the same room together.

The feature originally landed on Teams in July 2020 and later came to Android and Skype users. However, on Skype the feature was limited to large meetings. Microsoft is now expanding the ability, so Together mode now works on 1:1 calls on Skype.

In the announcement by Skype chief Luis Carrasco, Microsoft also debuted a new Scene for the platform. Specifically, a plane scene.

Future of Skype

What will happen with Skype moving forward remains to be seen. For the time being, Skype is not going anywhere, but it is hard to see how it can continue to co-exist with Microsoft Teams in the long term.

This is especially true now that Microsoft Teams is being baked into Windows 11.

On Windows 11 , Microsoft Teams is now directly integrated into the platform. This means Teams users can unmute and mute voice and video calls in the system tray on the Taskbar.

Furthermore, when Teams is running in the background, a “Share this Windows” option is available when hovering over the app icon. This allows users to share an app windows with Teams contacts through the Taskbar.

Tip of the day: By default computer names in Windows 10 tend to be quite plain. By default, they tend to be ‘WIN’ or ‘Desktop’, followed by a string of random letters and numbers. We show you how to change your PC name with Settings, Command Prompt or PowerShell to make it more easily identifiable.

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Microsoft Teams

Teams Chat Becomes Fluid (or Lively)

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First Fluid Component Delivered – More Coming

The Fluid framework is a technology developed by Microsoft (now open source) designed to help developers build better collaborative applications. The big selling point for the Fluid framework is its synchronization capabilities, which allow applications to coordinate updates made by multiple people to the same content and present the information in a coherent manner.

On May 25, Microsoft announced that Fluid components in Teams chat was then in private preview. On June 17, Microsoft followed up by saying that “the expansion of Fluid components for Teams meetings, OneNote, Outlook, and Whiteboard that make it easier to collaborate synchronously and asynchronously across Teams and Office apps.”

Confused by what Fluid is or means in practical terms? Well, soon you’ll get a chance to try the technology out in Teams chat. According to MC270177 (July 14), Microsoft will roll out “Fluid live components in Teams chat” in mid-August (Microsoft 365 roadmap item 82779) and expects to complete deployment by the end of August.

Wide Range of Live Components

The Fluid (or as they’re referred to in Teams, live) components enabled for Teams chats are:

  • Agenda. Build an agenda for a meeting (we’ll see more use of this component when it shows up in Teams meetings).
  • Table. Just like a table in Word.
  • Bulleted list and Numbered list. Work like any other bulleted and numbered list in a Microsoft word processor.
  • Checklist. Write down all the things people need to do. Like a task list, but with no assigned task owners and target dates.
  • Paragraph. Free text component that’s good for capturing ideas and sharing information like web links.
  • Task list. Build a set of tasks or follow-up items and assign tasks and expected completion dates to chat participants.

Don’t expect to paste text from Word or another editor into a live component and have it work perfectly. I could paste graphics from the clipboard into the paragraph component, but when I took formatted text like the content of this article (including embedded figures) and pasted it into the same component, the formatting suffered badly. On the other hand, cells pasted in from Excel worked well (as far as my tests went). My advice is to keep to simple text formatting whenever possible.

Getting Immediate and Concurrent Updates

To add a live component to a chat, create a new message, click the live component icon in the compose menu, and select the type of component to use (Figure 1). You can’t insert a live component into the compose message box when some content is already present  – the message must be perfectly blank before Teams allows you to insert a live component.

The range of live components which can be added to a Teams chat
Figure 1: The range of live components which can be added to a Teams chat

One way of thinking about this is that a live component is a container created in the owner’s OneDrive for Business account. Once you compose the content and send the message, Teams shares the component with others in the chat (Figure 2).

A sharing link allows chat participants access to the live component
Figure 2: A sharing link allows chat participants access to the live component

Once sent, the component is “live.” Any change made to its content is dynamically updated to anyone connected to the container using either the Teams desktop (Windows and MacOS) or mobile client. If you switch from chats to do other work or leave the device for a while, you will need to refresh the content of a live component when you return.

Microsoft’s pitch is that live containers bring content co-authoring to Teams analogous to the way Office documents stored in OneDrive for Business and SharePoint Online support co-authoring. As people make updates in the container, a facility like the Autosave feature in Office updates the copy in OneDrive for Business and publishes the updates to clients connected to the container. Anyone involved in the chat can work on the content and others see who’s currently working on the content as they type. Figure 3 shows a bulleted list component being updated. You can see a marker with the initials of the active user to show where they are working. In this case, it’s me (TR).

Editing a live component in a chat using the Teams for iOS mobile client
Figure 3: Editing a live component in a chat using the Teams for iOS mobile client

Microsoft’s belief is that by working together on shared content, people can avoid discussing topics in a long message thread or meetings. For instance, they can collaborate on creating a task list for a project in a single updatable object (the dream of OLE/DDE from 30 years ago) like the task list shown in Figure 4 without entering a to-and-fro discussion of what needs to be done, by whom, and when.

A Live tasks list in a Teams chat
Figure 4: A Live tasks list in a Teams chat

OneDrive Storage

Storage for live components in Teams chats is in OneDrive for Business as .fluid files created in the Microsoft Teams Chat Files folder in the owner’s account. Figure 5 shows a set of .fluid files and the access granted for one file. The sharing link isn’t very exciting because it allows members of the chat to access the component. Later, when more widespread support for live components exists in Office, you should be able to share a component more broadly with more people through more applications.

The files for Teams live components are stored in OneDrive for Business accounts
Figure 5: The files for Teams live components are stored in OneDrive for Business accounts

You can rename the .fluid files if you like but don’t delete them as this causes Teams some distress. An entry for the deleted live component persists in the chat but Teams can’t display it because the file is in the OneDrive recycle bin.

Issues Noted During Testing

Integrating a new technology into an existing platform like Teams is always going to throw up some issues. I noted several areas where I think Microsoft will make improvements or smoothen the implementation in the future, including:

  • No editing aids are available when editing text in components like fluid paragraphs. Teams chats and conversation threads have never had great support for basic facilities like spell checking, never mind the more sophisticated writing assistance found in Word.
  • The translation capabilities available for normal Teams chat messages aren’t available in live components. It’s much more difficult to send text to Microsoft Translator when the text changes all the time.
  • Share to Outlook doesn’t work. At least, Teams sends a message to the Outlook user, but the information which arrives isn’t useful. I suspect that this issue will go away when OWA and Outlook desktop support live components.
  • Data Loss Prevention (DLP) policies for Teams don’t detect violations posted in live components, so you can swear or include whatever other prohibited text you want.
  • Content searches can’t find text contained in live components. This implies that Microsoft Search does not index the content (you can search some metadata like the container name). The lack of indexing means that communication compliance policies don’t work either.
  • Live components appear to only work for chats with tenant users. I couldn’t use these components in chats involving guest users or federated (external) users. Signed in as a guest user in another tenant, Teams offered me the chance to include a live component in a chat and promptly failed when I tried to accept the offer. This was not a surprise as guest users don’t have OneDrive accounts.

These issues underline the newness of live components in Teams and illustrate the work Microsoft must do to support live components more completely across Teams. As noted above, Teams meetings (personal, not channel) are first. Afterwards, it’s likely Microsoft will consider the challenges of introducing live components in channel conversations. Among the issues here are the larger number of potential contributors in a channel thread and the complexities of dealing with private and shared channels (solutions for guest and federated access need to enable these scenarios).

Coming Soon to an Office Application Near You

In the future (soon according to Microsoft), it will be possible to share live containers with other Office applications like Outlook, OneNote, and Whiteboard. Given that a large percentage of email is external, using live components in Outlook (OWA first) will be a harder hill to climb if the sharing mechanism for live components doesn’t accommodate external users seamlessly without any need to mess around with sharing link permissions.

For now, it will be interesting to see how users take to live components in Teams chats and if this new capability stops people plunging into long message threads and interminable meetings. I must confess to having some doubts that live components will break entrenched user habits quickly but am certainly willing to be proven wrong.

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Microsoft Teams

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode

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Microsoft Teams Rooms on Android (MTRoA) – formerly known as Collaboration Bars, are designed to cater for both smaller meeting rooms and for individual users – known as personal mode.

In a meeting room scenario, typically you will pair a Microsoft Teams Room on Android device with a touch panel for the center of the room, and create a meeting room account that people can book.

In personal mode, setup is much simpler. A touch panel becomes optional (and maybe not even desired) and setup and sign-in is near-identical to a Teams Phone or Display; a user signs into the device as their own account and then can join their meetings.

You might want to buy and deploy MTRoA devices to staff that work from home and wish to use a bigger screen for meetings, or have their own office and will benefit from a wall-mounted display. At Microsoft Ignite 2021 (Spring Edition), Microsoft demonstrated their vision for this scenario as part of their Future of Work demo:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 1: Microsoft’s vision for personal collaboration spaces using Microsoft Teams Rooms.

Today, some of the vision hasn’t yet actualized, but the core concepts will arrive as part of the new Front Row view later this year. Due to features such as background effects, live captions and proximity join being available in MTRoA’s Personal Mode today, the experience is extremely good.

In the example below, an MTRoA deployed to a home environment in Personal Mode requires only the power and HDMI cabling to a screen and the device can be placed similar to a sound bar or consumer video device like the Facebook Portal TV:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 2: A Microsoft Teams Room on Android deployed to the home

The benefit of this simple deployment model is that the MTRoA device in Personal Mode is self-deploy for an employee because Android-based Teams devices have been updated for easier self-setup.

We’ll walk through the setup experience and what to expect when the MTRoA is configured and ready to use in Personal Mode.

Setup and Sign-in

If you are buying MTRoA devices for users, then it is worth considering ensuring that before they are shipped the vendor ensures they are on the most current (or nearly current) updates. If your supplier has had the devices sitting in a warehouse for the last twelve months then it is extremely likely that the device will not include up-to-date firmware for Personal Mode, or additional features released in April 2021, such as background effects.

You can see the latest release versions for MTRoA firmware on Microsoft Docs and validate with your supplier that the devices will include these; if you cannot then it is worthwhile considering enrolling the devices first, and then performing updates in the Teams Admin Center, before then signing out of the device and shipping it or installing it in an office for the user.

Upon first boot or after sign-out, the MTRoA device will begin at the sign-in page. However, before attempting sign-in, the first task a user must perform when connecting an MTRoA device is to connect it to a Wireless LAN if it’s not connected via ethernet. To do this, use the MTRoA remote control and select the settings cog:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 3: The first-boot sign-in page on an MTRoA device.

In the setting page, various options such as time zone, Bluetooth device connectivity, camera settings and network settings can be configured. At the end of the list of settings, Wi-Fi connectivity can be configured. This will require the user to enter the default admin password (a PIN) which is typically 0000, then to select and join their Wi-Fi network:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 4: The MTRoA settings page for Wi-Fi connectivity.

If you don’t want the user to continue to be able to configure administrative settings on the device after sign-in, then create a configuration profile in the Teams Admin Center, and assign it to the respective devices. Within the configuration profile a replacement default PIN can be set to prevent further configuration and also to set core settings, such as the timezone on behalf of the user.

After connecting to a network, return to the sign-in page and, after choosing sign-in, the user will be provided the opportunity to either sign-in using their Azure AD credentials, or the option to Sign in from another device. This second option makes it easier for a user to sign in to the MTRoA device because it does not require the user to attempt to use an infra-red remote control and on-screen keyboard to enter their username and password, so we’ll choose that:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 5: Sign-in to the user’s Azure AD account.

After choosing this option a code is displayed on the screen with instructions to visit microsoft.com/devicelogin. This “sign-in with a code” feature is commonly used on services such as Netflix on TV sets to make it easier for a user to complete sign in using their PC or mobile device. In this scenario, the user should visit that URL on a work PC or work mobile device, as this will allow them to leverage their currently signed in credentials for easy login:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 6: “Sign in with a code” on an MTRoA device.

Once login completes, the device will complete registration and arrive at the MTRoA home screen. This includes the user’s calendar appointments for the day, the option to Meet now and call another person, and quick access to relevant settings via the More ellipses:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 7: The MTRoA home screen.

Within the More section, it is worth ensuring that Proximity Join is enabled:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 8: Examining the settings available for quick access in the More section.

This then means that a user can choose either to use the MTRoA remote control and select the meeting from the calendar on screen, but also for ad-hoc meetings and calls, or when joining a meeting from the PC select the MTRoA as a device to use in the meeting:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 9: On the desktop Teams application on PC and Mac, choose Room Audio to select the MTRoA using Proximity Join.

After joining a meeting, settings are available in-meeting for common tasks such as leave, video on/off, mic on/off, meeting attendees, volume and to add participants. Additional options are available under the ellipses such as Start recording, turn on/off live captions, raise hand, turn off incoming video and in larger meetings, Together Mode and Large Gallery view. In particular for Personal Mode, Change Background allows you to enable background blur and select from built-in background effects:

Setup Microsoft Teams Rooms in Personal Mode
Figure 10: Selecting options in-meeting on MTRoA.
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