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In recent months, rumors have circulated that when the iPhone 14 arrives in the fall, it will come with two distinct variants. While the model selection will remain the same, Apple will use different chips in premium models than the standard iPhone. New reports suggest this is a strategy will use on all new iPhones moving forward.

This means the iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max will get the newest Bionic CPU Apple has. The regular iPhone 14 and other non-pro models will not get the latest and greatest chipset.

According to often-accurate Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, the reason for this change is to enhance profit margins. In previous years, all new iPhone models have had the latest Bionic CPU on board. Apple has used other specs to differentiate between the models (notably the camera).

Moving forward – starting with the iPhone 14 – this will change. Apple is putting a clear line between the performance of Pro models compared to non-Pro models.

Profits

Essentially, Apple is hoping customers will want the best possible performance and be willing to pay more for premium iPhones. In other words, Apple wants to boost the sales of its Pro models and increase its profits.

Kuo points out that if customers take the bait the average price of an iPhone will increase, and Apple will rake in more cash. Of course, for consumers, this means paying north of $1,000 if you want to experience the latest Apple processing capabilities.

While you may brush off the importance of the CPU, Apple’s Bionic chips are routinely the best smartphone processors on the market. Each year, if you buy an iPhone with the latest A-processor, you likely have the best-performing smartphone around.

Tip of the day: Windows Update downloads can often be frustrating because they are several gigabytes in size and can slow down your internet connection. That means your device may work with reduced performance while the update is downloading. In our guide, we show you how to limit bandwidth for Windows Update downloads, so they won’t bother you again.

Source  Winbuzzer

Juliana Luwoye

The author Juliana Luwoye

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